The Wonder of Chinese Tea by Tom Kelton

With Autumn upon us, becoming familiar with the diverse rang of teas at your disposal becomes so important.

Teas are wonderfully medicinal, and can help to warm you on a cool night or even shake that cold you’ve had for the last 3 days.  The exact origins of tea are widely debated, however the Chinese people have enjoyed brewing tea for over an entire millennia, since the Han Dynasty.

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There are 8 different distinct types of popular Chinese tea.

Green tea – This particular type of tea is made from a process that uses less oxidation than other types of tea leaves. While oolong and black tea use a long level of exposure to make their leaves, green tea minimize their exposure to withering.
Oolong tea – One of the most popular types of tea in China, Oolong originates from the Fujian region but has various degrees of oxidation, ranging anywhere from 8 to 85%. You can immediately notice oolong tea because of the curled or twisted look due to how long they get sun exposure.
Black tea – Black tea is more oxidized than any other type of tea in China and produces a brown or red effect for the tea. This helps to give the tea the strong flavor that many praise it for. This tea is notable for retaining their flavor for many years.
Red tea – Derived from the leaves of Camellia Sinesis tea plants that can be found all over China, Japan, Africa and India, Chinese red tea is distinct because of their dark leaves. Some people prefer the name Rooibos tea.
White tea – While there’s a lot of disagreement in what is acceptable for the definition of a white tea plant, they don’t get nearly as much exposure to withering as other types of tea leaves do. White tea leaves are minimally processed and refers to several different types of tea.
Yellow tea – This is one of the most expensive and rarest types of teas out there. While the oxidation process is similar to green tea, there’s an added step in the production of yellow tea which involves letting the leaves be steamed under a damp cloth. This is why they have a yellow color to them.
Flower tea – Also known as the flowering tea or blooming tea, these plants have a unique ability to bloom when they’re being brewed at the right temperature. They’ve also been the subject of controversy over how many health benefits they provide and which ones are truthful.
Compressed tea – Also known as tea bricks, aren’t commonly popular as much as other types of teas. This is made when tea leaves are crushed into disc or brick like shapes.

If you have any questions about which tea is right for you, don’t hesitate to call Tom at Restore for some advice.